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Monday, November 9, 2020 | History

3 edition of Essays on civil government, and subjection and obedience to the higher powers found in the catalog.

Essays on civil government, and subjection and obedience to the higher powers

Wood, Thomas

Essays on civil government, and subjection and obedience to the higher powers

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Published by printed by W. Lyon in Wigan .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesEighteenth century -- reel 5403, no. 7.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[2],72p.
Number of Pages72
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16997417M

Vol. 21 of the 33 vol. Collected Works contains a number of Mill’s essays on the law, women and children, the American Civil War, and his book on The Subjection of Women. It also contains in the Appendix Harriet Taylor’s works On Marriage and the Enfranchisement of Women.


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Essays on civil government, and subjection and obedience to the higher powers by Wood, Thomas Download PDF EPUB FB2

Essays on civil government: Essays on civil government Subjection and Obedience to the higher powers. (eBook, ) [] Your list has reached the maximum number of items. Please create a new list with a new name; move some items to a new or existing list; or delete some items. Your request to send this item has been completed.

The "powers"—the "higher" powers,—Government in the abstract—the institution of civil rule. Subjection is enjoined to civil government; v.

1: "Be subject:" that is, voluntarily, freely, and cheerfully rendering allegiance and homage, and yielding a and subjection and obedience to the higher powers book and conscientious obedience to the wholesome laws enacted by the "higher powers." In other words, what is here meant is something.

The apostle enters upon his subject thus—“Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers; for there is no power but of God: the powers that be, are ordained of God.” Here he urges the duty of obedience from this topic of argument, that civil rulers, as they are supposed to fulfill the pleasure of God, are the ordinance of : John Zumbrunnen.

Let us now trace the apostle’s reasoning in favor of submission to the higher powers, a little more particularly and exactly. For by this it will appear, on one hand, how good and conclusive it is, for submission to those rulers who exercise their power in a proper manner: And, on the other, how weak and trifling and unconnected it is, if it be supposed to be meant by the apostle to show.

Certainly not: “the powers that be are ordained of God,”—Rom. ,—a fact which we may gather from the very constitution of man as a social being,—made for society, for co-operation with his fellows.

Civil government has a higher origin than mere human ingenuity: God is its author. Romans "Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers." Let us now trace the apostle's reasoning in favor of submission to the higher powers, a little more particularly and by this it will appear, on one hand, how good and conclusive it is, for submission to those rulers who exercise their power in a proper manner: And, on the other, how weak and trifling and.

In American law, the people which form the several states are the "higher powers," not the Federal government. Of course, in a religious sense, they are to submit themselves to the ultimate "higher power," which is the risen and exalted Christ (Matthew ; Revelation ).

THAT if unlimited obedience and non-resistance be here required as a duty under any one form of government, it is also required as a duty under all other forms; and as a duty to subordinate rulers as well as to the supreme.) AND lastly, that those civil rulers to whom the apostle enjoins subjection, are the persons.

in possession; the powers. Michael Foley and Bob Edwards wrote their essay, “The Paradox of Civil Society,” to illustrate that society needs individuals who want to make a difference to take action. They write, “If civil society is to be ‘strong,’ it must be strong in defense of citizens’ interests, whether those spring from ‘salient social cleavages’ or.

The Functions of Civil Government. Romans sets forth the function of civil government. Let us studiously consider this context. First, the “higher powers” are identified as the “rulers” of civil government (1, 3).

Second, they are said to be “ordained of God” (1). Exactly what does that expression mean. RomansKJV: "Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God." RomansNASB: "Every person is to be in subjection to the governing authorities.

For there is no authority except from God, and those which exist are established by God.". Similarly, a short term obedience is not an attribute of sovereignty.

The power of the sovereignhas to be permanent in society. v) Law is the will and the command of the sovereign. He is the source of law. Law is a commandgiven by a superior to the inferiors who are in a state of subjection or dependence. Civil disobedience is a symbolic or ritualistic violation of the law rather than a rejection of the system as a whole.

The civil disobedient, finding legitimate avenues of change blocked or nonexistent, feels obligated by a higher, extralegal principle to break some specific law. It is because acts associated with civil disobedience are considered crimes, however, and known by actor and public.

• Civil disobedience is permitted when the government’s laws or commands are in direct violation of God’s laws and commands. • If a Christian disobeys an evil government, unless he can flee from the government, he should accept that government’s punishment for his actions.

Civil society consists of “institutions which hedge about the power of the state” and presupposes a government of limited powers.

The separation of civil society from the state or government requires the safeguards of competing political parties, a representative legislature, an independent judiciary, and a free press. Civil obedience according to Scripture With such strong admonitions in scripture to be subject to the government, why do Reformed Protestants so quickly decide to engage in civil disobedience.

In familiar words, the apostle Paul makes clear our need to submit to the governing authorities in Romanswhich we must not pay mere lip-service to. XIII. () Subject unto the higher powersLooking impartially at the passage which follows, it would seem at first sight--and perhaps not only at first sight--that the Apostle distinctly preaches two doctrines, both of which are now discredited, the doctrines of divine right and of passive obedience.

John Locke (–).Two Treatises on Government. Book II. Of Civil Government: Chapter XIII. Of the Subordination of the Powers of the Commonwealth. Nothing can be more unfounded. It is not introduced as the ground of obedience to civil government. The grounds obedience is stated in the first verse, immediately subjoined to the command.

The higher powers are to be obeyed, because there is not one amongst them, not. Romans Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers.

John A. Widstoe "The Church believes that 'Governments were instituted of God for the benefit of man; and that He holds men accountable for their acts in relation to them, both in making laws and administering them, for the good and safety of society.' (D.

& C. A summary of Part X (Section1) in Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Civil Disobedience and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Steve’s Answer: In chapter 13 of the great book of Romans, St. Paul basically says civil authorities have been ordained by God to maintain civil order, and that obedience to civil government and governing civil authorities is therefore a necessity.

is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God. Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation.

– Rom This is probably the most famous of all verses in the Bible commanding obedience to civil authorities. It is a very needful. Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience" Major Themes Civil Government and Higher Law.

In Civil Disobedience, Thoreau's basic premise is that a higher law than civil law demands the obedience of the individual. Human law and government are subordinate. In cases where the two are at odds with one another, the individual must follow his conscience and.

Every person is to be in subjection to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those which exist are established by God. - New American Standard Version () Let every soul be in subjection to the higher powers: for there is no power but of God; and the `powers' that be are ordained of God.

Adam Clarke Commentary. Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers - This is a very strong saying, and most solemnly introduced; and we must consider the apostle as speaking, not from his own private judgment, or teaching a doctrine of present expediency, but declaring the mind of God on a subject of the utmost importance to the peace of the world; a doctrine which does not exclusively.

Bible verses related to Civil Disobedience from the King James Version (KJV) by Relevance - Sort By Book Order Acts - Then Peter and the [other] apostles answered and. Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God.

Let every soul be in subjection to the higher powers: for there is no power but of God; and the powers that be are ordained of God. Civil Government. Civic Duties. Honouring Rulers. Orderliness In Society. Citizenship. In his essay on “Calvin and Civil Government” John McNeill remarks No obedience can be given to government when it commands what God forbids, or forbids what God commands.

It is evident from Rom. xiii. that all subjection and obedience to higher powers commanded there, is subjection to the power of the magistrate. By powers, εξουσιαις, we are to understand the deputies of the emperors, such as proconsuls, etc., and all such as are in authority - under the supreme powers wherever we dwell.

See the doctrine of obedience to the civil powers discussed at large in the notes on Romans Civil power only came along almost 2, years later. Thus, civil government must be less necessary to human existence than the private sector. Additionally, neither Rom. 13 nor 1 Pet.

2 establish rules of conduct or conscience that are either higher than, or superior to, the Ten Commandments. (n.) The act of bringing under the dominion of another; the act of subduing.

(n.) The state of being subject, or under the power, control, and government of another; a state of obedience or submissiveness; as, the safety of life, liberty, and property depends on our subjection to the laws.

It is this: Let every soul be subject to the higher powers. Let every man be obedient to the civil government under which the providence of God has cast his lot. For there is no power but of God - As God is the origin of power, and the supreme Governor of the universe, he delegates authority to whomsoever he will; and though in many cases the governor himself may not be of God, yet civil.

Logically to draw the above conclusion, the first premise must be construed to mean, “It is right for any citizen of the civil government, acting as an agent of the government, to bear the sword and punish evil-doers.” It is assumed that “the powers that be” of Romans includes the civil government with all its citizens and subjects.

Consider the case of Stanley Milgram, the social psychologist at the City University of New York whose book Obedience to Authority was published in The book was Milgram's summary of and reflections upon a series of experiments he had begun conducting back inwhen he was a newly minted Harvard PhD in the second year of his first.

The Subjection of Women is an essay by English philosopher, political economist and civil servant John Stuart Mill published inwith ideas he developed jointly with his wife Harriet Taylor submitted the finished manuscript of their collaborative work On Liberty () soon after her untimely death in lateand then continued work on The Subjection of Women until its.

The King James at this place has “higher powers,” which makes room for the idea of being better than something else. The reason this is of some interest is that huperecho appears four other times in the New Testament.

Once is in 1 Peterin that letter’s passage about civil government. The first nine verses of the chapter are devoted to this subject, showing that the powers that he are ordained of God, and enjoining upon Christians, upon every soul in fact, the duty of respectful subjection to civil government.

The whole passage reads as follows:— CGRRLL “Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. THE GREAT end of men’s entering into society, being the enjoyment of their properties in peace and safety, and the great instrument and means of that being the laws established in that society; the first and fundamental positive law of all commonwealths is the establishing of the legislative power: as the first and fundamental natural law, which is to govern even the legislative.

Logically to draw the above conclusion, the first premise must be construed to mean, “It is right for any citizen of the civil government, acting as an agent of the government, to bear the sword and punish evil-doers.” It is assumed that “the powers that be” of Romans includes the civil government with all its citizens and subjects.

Paul gives us some reasons for submitting to government authority also. Governmental authority is ordained of God. Romans Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God. In the book of Daniel we learn that God sets up men as kings and deposes them as he wills.But these two powers, political and paternal, are so perfectly distinct and separate; are built upon so different foundations, and given to so different ends, that every subject that is a father, has as much a paternal power over his children, as the prince has over his: and every prince, that has parents, owes them as much filial duty and obedience, as the meanest of his subjects do to theirs.Lest this liberty should be turned into licentiousness, and misconstrued to countenance faction and rebellion, the apostle enjoins obedience to civil government, which was the more necessary to be pressed now because the magistrates were heathens and unbelievers, which yet did not destroy their civil power and authority.