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3 edition of Seminar on Characterizing and Remediating Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids at Hazardous Sites found in the catalog.

Seminar on Characterizing and Remediating Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids at Hazardous Sites

Seminar on Characterizing and Remediating Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids at Hazardous Sites

presentation outlines and slide copy

by

  • 185 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development in Cincinnati, Ohio .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hazardous waste sites -- United States.,
  • Nonaqueous solvents -- Environmental aspects -- United States.,
  • Groundwater -- Pollution -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesPresentation outlines and slide copy.
    StatementUnited States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development.
    ContributionsUnited States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings)
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16385643M

    The item Nonaqueous phase liquids compatibility with materials used in well construction, sampling, and remediation, Douglas R. McCaulou, David G. Jewett, and Scott G. Huling Nonaqueous phase liquids compatibility with materials used in well construction, sampling, and remediation, Douglas R. McCaulou, David G. Jewett, and Scott G. Huling. Proceedings of the 10th Annual Conference on Hazardous Waste Research MODELING OF DISSOLUTION TRANSPORT OF NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID WASTES IN HETEROGENEOUS AQUIFERS S. Okeson, T.H. Illangasekare, D.C. Szlag and J.E. Ewing, Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO . A Comparison of Field Techniques for Confirming Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids Last Updated on Tue Oct 24 th Download PDF ( MB) Who We Are. Geoprobe Systems® is a team of skilled designers and craftsmen sharing the simple goal of producing the best possible subsurface probing and drilling equipment and tools in the world. To achieve.


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Seminar on Characterizing and Remediating Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids at Hazardous Sites Download PDF EPUB FB2

VvEPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development Cincinnati, OH EPA//K/ May Seminar on Characterizing and Remediating Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids at Hazardous Sites Presentation Outlines and Slide Copy U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency Region 5, Library (PLJ) 77 West Jackson Boulevard, 12th Floor. Get this from a library.

Seminar on Characterizing and Remediating Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids at Hazardous Sites: presentation outlines and slide copy. [United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development.;]. The environmental problems associated with DNAPLs (dense, nonaqueous phase liquids) are well known: DNAPLs are extremely difficult to locate, small amounts contaminate large volumes, conventional groundwater extraction technologies do not work, and restoration of DNAPL sites to drinking water standards or maximum contaminant levels is considered unattainable.

Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids. The DNAPLs Team began in to foster a better understanding of the applicability, cost, and limitations of technologies for characterizing and remediating dense non-aqueous phase liquids.

DNAPLs are a significant problem to groundwater supplies when released as discarded industrial solvents or waste. The Consortium is one of seven Action Teams of the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF). It was established in Maywhen representatives from various companies, universities, EPA, DoD, and DOE met to discuss their mutual interest in developing in situ bioremediation technologies to degrade chlorinated solvents in soils and ground water.

This paper examines the behavior of dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in fractured clay and rock. The conditions under which a DNAPL will enter an initially water‐saturated, rough‐walled fracture are outlined and expressed in a number of ways, including the height to which a DNAPL pool can accumulate above a fracture prior to initial entry.

Jun Lu, in Introduction to Environmental Forensics (Third Edition), Monitoring Data of Light Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) Light Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) generally refers to petroleum hydrocarbon liquids that are lighter than water (e.g., gasoline, diesel). Because it is less dense than water, LNAPL will typically stop near the water table once it infiltrates through the.

Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are present at numerous hazardous waste sites and are suspected to exist at many more.

Due to the numerous variables influencing DNAPL transport and fate in the subsurface, and consequently, the ensuing complexity, DNAPLs are largely undetected and yet are likely to be a significant limiting factor in site remediation.

Harold F. Hemond, Elizabeth J. Fechner, in Chemical Fate and Transport in the Environment (Third Edition), The Flow of Nonaqueous Phase Liquids. Flow in the unsaturated zone is an example of multiphase flow, because more than one fluid phase is present (i.e., air and water).An additional, immiscible fluid phase occurs when NAPL enters porous media, for example after liquid.

Technical and Economic Evaluation of Coal Tar Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) Pumping Techniques, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA, and Baltimore Gas & E lectric Co. TR -   Abstract. Past releases of chlorinated solvents generally occurred as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs).

Because DNAPLs are heavier than water and are sparingly soluble, they pose difficult characterization, remediation and long-term management challenges. The propagation of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in water‐saturated, homogeneous porous media was investigated.

The static distribution of DNAPL after gravity‐driven displacement was studied using a number of three‐dimensional spill experiments. Fingering intrinsic to the displacement systems was observed in all experiments. Ronald W. Falta, Modeling sub‐grid‐block‐scale dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) pool dissolution using a dual‐domain approach, Water Resources Research, 39, 12, ().

Seung-Woo Jeong and M Yavuz Corapcioglu, A micromodel analysis of factors influencing NAPL removal by surfactant foam flooding, Journal of Contaminant Hydrology. The purpose of this book is to help engineers and scientists better understand dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination of groundwater and the methods and technology used for characterization and remediation.

Remediation of DNAPL source zones is very difficult and controversial and must be based on state-of-the-art knowledge of the.

“Plume Persistence Due to Aquitard Back Diffusion Following Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Removal or Isolation.” Water resource Research 41 (12). Cho, H. J., R. Fiacco, and M. Daly. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are immiscible fluids with a specific gravity greater than, water.

When present, DNAPLs present a serious and long‐term source of continued ground water and soil contamination (Pankow and Cherry ). Accurate characterization and delineation of DNAPL in the subsurface is critical for evaluating.

The remediation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in porous media continues to be one of the most challenging problems facing environmental scientists and engineers.

Of all the environmentally relevant DNAPLs, tars in the subsurface at former manufactured gas plants (FMGP’s) pose one of the biggest challenges due to their complex.

Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol No 3, pSequential steps used to treat and immobilize oil constituents of an oil sludge-contaminated soil sample involved initial oxidation treatment by a Fenton-type reaction for a period of 80 h, followed by S/S of the oxidized sample for 2 h with clay and lime, and then solidification of.

For technical information on seminar content, contact Ed Barth, CERI, at Characterizing and Remediating Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids at Hazardous Sites This seminar series will deal with the evaluation and characterization of sites where dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) are a problem.

A dense non-aqueous phase liquid or DNAPL is a denser-than-water NAPL, i.e. a liquid that is both denser than water and is immiscible in or does not dissolve in water.

The term DNAPL is used primarily by environmental engineers and hydrogeologists to describe contaminants in groundwater, surface water and tends to sink below the water table when spilled in significant. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids.

[Ada, Okla.: Superfund Technology Support Center for Ground Water, Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory, ] (OCoLC) The technical difficulties involved in characterizing and remediating source zones and the potential costs are so significant that there have been no reported cases of large DNAPL (dense nonaqueous phase liquid) sites where remediation has restored the site to drinking water standards.

Nonaqueous Phase Liquids Compatibility With Materials Used in Well Construction, Sampling, and Remediation. This issue paper provides a comprehensive literature review regarding the compatibility of NAPLs with a wide variety of materials used at hazardous waste sites.

A condensed reference table of compatibility data for chemicals and This paper examines the behaviour of dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in fractured media, with an emphasis on waste-disposal ponds constructed in fractured clay and rock. Calculations are presented to estimate the height of DNAPL that may accumulate at the base of a disposal pond prior to initial entry into a water-saturated fracture.

These organic-phase liquids are often sparingly soluble in water, and in the context of soil and sediment contamination are termed non-aqueous phase liquids or NAPLs. NAPLs such as fuel oil, creosote, gasoline and coal tar are multi-component mixtures that are composed of a broad range of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs).

are present, separate phase or sorbed contaminants serve as a long-lived contami-nation source to groundwater. The technical difficulties involved in characterizing and remediating source zones and the potential costs are so significant that there have been no reported cases of large DNAPL (dense nonaqueous phase liquid) sites where remediation.

Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are present at numerous hazardous waste sites and are suspected to exist at many more. Due to the numerous variables influencing DNAPL transport and fate in the subsurface, and consequently, the ensuing complexity, DNAPLs are largely undetected and yet are likely to be a significant limiting factor in site remediation.

Hydraulic displacement is a mass removal technology suitable for stabilization of a dense, nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone, where stabilization is defined as reducing DNAPL saturations and reducing the risk of future pool mobilization.

High resolution three‐dimensional multiphase flow simulations incorporating a spatially. Seminar on Characterizing and Remediating Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids at Hazardous Waste Sites: View: Morter, Farhat, Curl: The v~1 fundamental of HCCN: evidence for quasilinearity: View: Connor: GSI User's Guide: Texas Risk Reduction Rules for Closure/Remediation: View.

Bioremediation, SVE, and ZVI degrade or constrain a narrow range of contaminants and are generally unable to treat sorbed contaminants and dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) due to mass. Characterization of sites with separate phase contaminants such as light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) is critical to remediation of sites contaminated with organics.

The principles developed within the. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) have a specific gravity greater than water, and light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) have a specific gravity less than water [Huling and Weaver, ].

Both of these liquids are of major environmental concern because they are commonly found in the subsurface at Superfund sites as well as other. Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids and Flux-Based Site Remediation. DNAPLs are organic liquids with a density greater than water.

They include solvents, coal tar, and creosotes. Contamination of groundwater can occur as a result of dissolved plumes generated from DNAPL source zones.

DNAPLs pose significant challenges in site remediation. Assessment of Dense Nonaqueous- Phase Liquid Mobility in the Subsurface at Manufactured Gas Plan Sites. D.W. Tomlinson, J.A. Clock, D.V. Nakles, N.A. Azzolina, G. Process upscaling of nonaqueous phase liquid behavior in heterogenous aquifers.

In: Reddi LN, ed. Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) in the Subsurface Environment: Assessment and Remediation: Proceedings of A Specialty Conference held in Conjunction with the ASCE National Convention, November, Washington, DC.

Publications Details for: Great Plains/Rocky Mountain Hazardous Substance Research Centers Grant Number R RFA: Hazardous Substance Research Centers - HSRC (). Some of the most challenging to remediate are dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including chlorinated solvents.

Each of the NRC studies has, in one form or another, recognized that in almost all cases, complete restoration of contaminated groundwater is difficult, and in a substantial fraction of contaminated sites, not likely to be.

Techniques for Confirming Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids by Terry W. Griffin and Kenneth W. Watson Pages 48–59 DAbstract ense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are immiscible fluids with a specific gravity greater than water.

When present, DNAPLs present a serious and long-term source of continued ground water and soil con. investigation of sites where DNAPL is present is the possible contamination of the groundwater in deeper strata as a. result of drilling through zones of free DNAPL.

If a deep boring intersects a pool. of DNAPL in a granular m dia or a zone of free DNAPL in a fractured. ABSTRACT A laboratory experiment was conducted to demonstrate the behavior of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) in a complex aquifer system.

The system simulated consists of two unconfined aquifers separated by a low permeable bedrock perching layer. Characterizing and Remediating DNAPL Sites – What we Have Learned From the Past 10 Years. VI International Seminar on Remediation and Redevelopment of Contaminated Sites.

EKOS Institute Brazil, Sao Paulo, October 27 – 28, Kueper, B.H., Invited Talk. Remediation of Dense, Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids.Grant G.P. and J.I. Gerhard (). Simulating the dissolution of a complex dense nonaqueous phase liquid source zone: 1.

Model to predict interfacial area. Water Resources Research, Grant G.P. and J.I. Gerhard (). Simulating the dissolution of a complex dense nonaqueous phase liquid .Cleanup of groundwater plume source areas associated with these compounds is problematic, in part, because the compounds often exist in the subsurface as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs).

Ganglia (or 'blobs') of DNAPL serve as persistent sources of contaminants that are difficult to locate and remediate (e.g. Fenwick and Blunt, ).